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SOUNDCLOUD

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MEDIA TESTER (SLIDESHOW, SOUNDCLOUD, YOUTUBE)

SLIDESHOW

This here is a slideshow. It is 3-columns wide (532px), has PREV / NEXT buttons and a footer bar with captions. It is set to auto play, with a 1-second pause on each slide. The show should loop back to the beginning. If you click any slide, a gallery viewer pop-up will show high-res images.

RMHP, by Jersey Shore, PA—once truly a community.
RMHP, by Jersey Shore, PA—once truly a community.
New owner voids leases, plans a fracking-support site.
New owner voids leases, plans a fracking-support site.
Resister Deb Eck and daughters vow to stay.
Resister Deb Eck and daughters vow to stay.
Eviction and resistance affect RMHP’s kids.
Eviction and resistance affect RMHP’s kids.
A former home site hosted community meetings.
A former home site hosted community meetings.
Former residents at their solidarity tent.
Former residents at their solidarity tent.
Unable to move it, owners strip their home.
Unable to move it, owners strip their home.
Eviction fighters get civil disobedience tips.
Eviction fighters get civil disobedience tips.
New owners' on-site security team with resisters.
New owners' on-site security team with resisters.
Activists confront new owners' security.
Activists confront new owners' security.
New owner fenced residents in, supporters out.
New owner fenced residents in, supporters out.
Movement leader Eck finally decides to move.
Movement leader Eck finally decides to move.
RMHP in mid June 2012, a vacant construction site.
RMHP in mid June 2012, a vacant construction site.
The new Eck home, still in a fracking zone.
The new Eck home, still in a fracking zone.

 

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YOUTUBE

2-column size (for HOME PAGE)

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<iframe width=”532″ height=”299″ src=”http://www.youtube.com/embed/REqhDH8PWbc?rel=0″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

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The Power of One

 

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The Power of One: Energy & The 2012 Election

Mitt Romney and Barack Obama

Mitt Romney and Barack Obama

This year’s election is about power — the power to shape the nation’s domestic and foreign priorities; the power to lead, to legislate, to govern. Energy policy, defining how we use energy to power our economy and our lives, is among the most pressing issues for the next four years.

In this special two-hour edition of BURN, stories about the power of one: how, in this election season, a single person, place, policy or idea can — with a boost from science — affect the nation’s search for greater energy independence.

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Hour One: The Power of One Election and America’s Energy Future

President Barack Obama and his opponent, Mitt Romney, share one broad policy goal — greater energy independence for the United States. They differ on how to achieve it. In this hour of BURN, host Alex Chadwick goes to the sometime swing state of Pennsylvania to examine fracking, the politically volatile exploration technology that has made natural gas the single most important element remaking our energy economy. We also go to Michigan, where voters will say yea or nay to wind power — praised by many Democrats as a renewable energy source well worth supporting; criticized by many Republicans as not viable in the free marketplace.

Full Broadcast (54 minutes in three segments)

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Hour One: Segment A: Fracking

runtime 17:40

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Pennsylvania’s Changing Landscape

Pennsylvania, Fracking

A burn-off from a fracking site illuminates the Pennsylvania sky.(Photo: Les Stone)

Mention the words “Marcellus Shale” to most folks in the U.S., and you’d probably get no response. Mention those words to Pennsylvanians and the reaction is likely to be sharp and opinionated, because the economic well-being of the state in significant part is tied to everything those two words represent. The Marcellus Shale is a vast, underground repository of natural gas that runs beneath parts of Pennsylvania, New York, Ohio and West Virginia. The extraction of that fossil fuel has helped resuscitate economies, including Pennsylvania’s, providing residents with jobs and money-laced mineral leases. For the nation, the Marcellus Shale has meant a bountiful and relatively cheap new energy source. The Marcellus Shale has generated considerable controversy, however. Some argue that hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) — the underground injection of vast quantities of water and chemicals to mine the natural gas — is harmful to the environment. Once that water has served its purpose, it has to be disposed of, and fracking wastewater has its own set of issues: it is laced with toxins, and there’s so much of it that it’s hard to find safe disposal sites. All this is the backdrop to our story, which examines the impact natural gas exploration has had on one place – Pennsylvania – and particularly on a group of people who had the misfortune of living on top of a Marcellus Shale flashpoint.

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Web Extra: A Photo Essay

WATCH: For a photo essay of how fracking has impacted one community in Pennsylvania, click here.

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Hour One: Segment B: Energy and The President

runtime 8:48

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Part 1: Wisdom From a Former Climate Skeptic

Physicist Richard Muller says he is a “converted skeptic.” Once one of the most prominent voices questioning the link between human activity and global warming, Dr. Muller has since conducted his own exhaustive research and changed his mind. Now, he is out with a book entitled “Energy for Future Presidents,” in which he plots a course for what is to come. Alex speaks with Dr. Muller to find out what he would advise for the next four years.

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Part 2: What Should the President Know?

If you had JUST ONE MINUTE with the president of the United States, what would you tell him about our energy future? We posed that challenge to researchers and experts in various aspects of the energy question.

SPEAKERS

Robert Bullard

Listen to Robert’s minute. Or listen here on iPhone & iPad.

 

Robert Bullard: Dean of Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University. Bullard is a leading scholar of environmental justice and says power plants, as well as waste dumps, are often sited in communities of color. More about Robert

Steven Cowley

Listen to Steven’s minute. Or listen here on iPhone & iPad.

 

Steven Cowley: Director of the UK’s leading fusion research center. Cowley is working towards bringing the technology out of the realm of science fiction into science fact. More about Steven

Jane Long

Listen to Jane’s minute. Or listen here on iPhone & iPad.

 

Jane Long: Associate Director at Large for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory working on energy and climate. Long is looking into how to adapt energy systems in light of climate change. More about Jane

Alec Loorz

Listen to Alec’s minute. Or listen here on iPhone & iPad.

 

Alec Loorz: Our youngest expert, at 18-years-old, Loorz has taken up the mission of informing his peers about global climate change. He is the founder of the organization “Kids vs Global Warming.” More about Alec

Lisa Margonelli

Listen to Lisa’s minute. Or listen here on iPhone & iPad.

 

Lisa Margonelli: Director of the Energy Policy Initiative at the New America Foundation. Margonelli writes about the economy of energy and is the author of the book “Oil On the Brain: Petroleum’s Long Strange Trip to Your Tank.” More about Lisa

Ron Ness

Listen to Ron’s minute. Or listen here on iPhone & iPad.

 

Ron Ness: President of the North Dakota Petroleum Council, a trade association representing the oil and gas industry in North Dakota. More about Ron

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Web Extra: What Should the President Know?

From fish to biofuel Mike Mageau has developed a fish-algea-plants greenhouse facility that aims to grow plants, raise fish, and make biofuel all at the same time. What would his one-minute energy advice moment be with the president?

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Hour One: Segment C: Energy and the Election

(runtime 12:23)

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Part 1: Michigan’s Historic Choice

Part of a wind farm in Gratiot County, Michigan.

Part of a wind farm in Gratiot County, Michigan.(Photo: Scott Carrier)

In Michigan during this election, voters could dramatically alter the manner in which the state consumes and conserves energy. Michigan now gets 80 percent of its electricity from coal burning plants. But the election could usher in the era of wind power, making the state a model for setting renewable energy standards.

A referendum on the Michigan ballot this fall would require 25 percent of the state’s electricity come from renewable energy resources by the year 2025. An estimated 80 percent of that energy will come from 2600 new wind turbines to be installed in clusters, or wind farms, around the state. Proponents claim that electricity from wind is now cost effective, close to the cheapest way to generate electricity. It’s also clean. Opponents – primarily coal and gas companies striving to preserve their market share of energy production in Michigan – say that wind energy has been cheap only because of large federal subsidies, which will soon expire. They claim the end result of the referendum, if passed, will be higher utility bills.

Reporter Scott Carrier addresses the question Michigan voters may confront one day after the November elections: If the referendum passes, then what? What is the science behind wind power and how do you get people to accept a field of enormous machines in their community?

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Part 2: Why Energy Legislation is So Hard

(runtime 5:33)

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Carol Browner

Carol Browner

Not long after he took office, President Obama created the first White House Office on Energy and Climate Change. He put a heavyweight at the head: former EPA Director Carol Browner. The office was situated on high prestige territory — in a suite next to the West Wing in the stately Old Executive Office Building. It was clear, it seemed, that the Obama administration was ready to push ahead with meaningful climate and energy legislation. The political odds seemed good: democrats held the House and Senate. The President himself had said prior to his election: “Energy we have to deal with today. Health care is priority number two.” Within two years, Browner had resigned, the office was disbanded, and prospects were dead for energy and climate legislation. The Obama Administration chose to withdraw from a political battle that could have produced the first serious U.S. energy and climate legislation. What happened? Alex talks with Carol Browner about why energy legislation, and especially energy/climate legislation is so hard, and examines what prospects remain for new energy and climate legislation at the national level.

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Hour Two: The Power and Politics of New Energy Frontiers

In the next four years, the United States will have one fundamental energy policy challenge — how to make the country more self-sufficient. Here are stories about the next frontiers of energy development, the fields of exploration that may help the U.S. to produce more energy at home and import less from abroad.

Full Broadcast (54 minutes in three segments)

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Hour Two: Segment A: Alaska, The New Frontier

Part 1: Exploring for Oil and Gas in the Arctic

(runtime 17:19)

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Elizabeth Arnold reporting form the Arctic

Elizabeth Arnold reports from the frozen Arctic Ocean, traveling on the U.S. Coast Guard polar icebreaker “Healy.” (Photo: Andrew Trites)

The Arctic is the new frontier for oil and gas production, with reserves potentially so large that the bounty could mean an unprecedented level of energy self-sufficiency for the United States. The U.S. Geological Survey estimates the Arctic holds about 22 percent of the world’s untapped oil and natural gas resources. But can industry safely operate a drill rig in such extremes and in the worst case, clean up an oil spill? Reporter Elizabeth Arnold takes listeners to the far north — 200 miles above the Arctic Circle to the top of Alaska, where Inupiaq (Native Alaskan) Eskimos are torn between the benefits of new oil development and the risks Arctic oil will pose to their 1,000-year-old whaling culture.

Pacific walrus inhabit the Arctic region, primarily living on the sea ice above the continental shelf. In recent summers, with less sea ice available, many have moved to the coast of Alaska and Russia.
(Photo: Andrew Trites)
The icebreaker HEALY backs and rams North through the Bering Srait to the Chukchi Sea. It’s capable of breaking 4 1/2 feet of ice continuously at 3 knots.
(Photo: Tom Van Pelt)
HEALY is one of more than two dozen vessels deployed in the Arctic this past summer as Shell prepared to drill exploratory wells in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas.
(Photo: Tom Van Pelt)

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Part 2: Obama and Romney Energy Platforms

(runtime 5:30)


Alex and reporter Elizabeth Arnold discuss America’s energy future, and where the presidential candidates currently stand on energy exploration and various sources of energy.

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Hour Two: Segment B: Running On Batteries

Part 1: The Elusive Mighty Battery

(runtime 10:30)

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Amy Prieto in the lab.(Photo: BURN)

Wind, solar, electric cars ­- all have a toehold in the American energy mix, but there’s one technical dilemma holding them back: batteries. Batteries are essential energy storage devices for anything touted as clean tech but right now they’re limited to a few hours of performance: they’re expensive, big and chemically dangerous.

Touted as the holy grail of green machines, there’s an international race going on to build a better battery. The people in that race will not only shift our energy future, they stand to make a lot of money. Amy Prieto, a chemist at Colorado State University, has designed a battery that seemingly has the right stuff. She’s created a prototype that recharges in a few minutes, discharges slowly, and is manufactured using non-toxic chemicals. She still has to solve some big challenges before the prototype can become a battery she can put in the hands of consumers, and that will likely take a few more years. Alex visits Amy Prieto and her team to learn just what the Prieto Battery is about and why creating a better battery is so difficult.
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Part 2: The Need for Speed

(runtime 7:57)

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Mike Pethel has driven fast cars for years, an interest afforded by his work as a color technologist who makes movies and commercials look more dazzling. Troubled by his own advertising campaigns for cars and trucks he came to see as wasteful, he sets out to build a ‘Green’ high-performance car. Starting with the carcass of an early 70’s BMW 3.0 CS, he is building a battery-powered car that is lighter and much quicker than the original. With an estimated 800 horsepower, it can beat any Ferrari ever built. Along the way, Mike learns how and why electric cars can be very good, very troublesome …and very, very fast. In one man’s obsessive quest for Green speed, we discover what lies ahead for those who hope electric cars might become a carbon salvation.


Alex visits Elco Welding in Venice, CA
Alex visits Elco Welding in Venice, CA
Bob Libow's father started Elco Welding in 1937
Bob Libow's father started Elco Welding in 1937
Repairing a cracked aluminum engine worth $7,000
Repairing a cracked aluminum engine worth $7,000
Elco doesn't stock parts - they make parts
Elco doesn't stock parts - they make parts
The carcas of a 1973 BMW soon to be a supecar
The carcas of a 1973 BMW soon to be a supecar
Bob Libow of Elco and Car builder Mike Pethel
Bob Libow of Elco and Car builder Mike Pethel

All photos by Hugh Hamilton

 

Web Extra: Batteries: The Unsung Hero of Modern Man – and How They Work

Batteries are everywhere and play an integral role in our lives. They’re also way under-appreciated.
Here is a simple explanation of how the Unsung Hero of Modern Man actually works.


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Part 3: Guiding The Energy Future

(runtime 3:50)

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Arun Majumdar

Arun Majumdar (Photo: Dept of Energy)

Alex speaks with Arun Majumdar, the former director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy (ARPA-E). The agency, inside the Department of Energy, is the only one of its kind to consider pioneering research that could transform our energy future. Among Majumdar’s favorite projects: research into creating gasoline completely inside a laboratory – without the need for plants or dug-up oil.

More Info
Bio of Arun Majumdar
Visit ARPA-E’s Website

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Previous Story >> BURN Radio Special #2: The Hunt for Oil

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COMMENTS

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Fracking vs. Riverdale Mobile Home Park 532

A Photo Essay by Lynn Johnson

Riverdale Mobile Home Park

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Aenean commodo ligula eget dolor. Aenean massa. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Donec quam felis, ultricies nec, pellentesque eu, pretium quis, sem. Nulla consequat massa quis enim. Donec pede justo, fringilla vel, aliquet nec, vulputate eget, arcu. In enim justo, rhoncus ut, imperdiet a, venenatis vitae, justo.

Nullam dictum felis eu pede mollis pretium. Integer tincidunt. Cras dapibus. Vivamus elementum semper nisi. Aenean vulputate eleifend tellus. Aenean leo ligula, porttitor eu, consequat vitae, eleifend ac, enim. Aliquam lorem ante, dapibus in, viverra quis, feugiat a, tellus. Phasellus viverra nulla ut metus varius laoreet. Quisque rutrum. Aenean imperdiet. Etiam ultricies nisi vel augue. Curabitur ullamcorper ultricies nisi. Nam eget dui. Etiam rhoncus. Maecenas tempus, tellus eget condimentum rhoncus, sem quam semper libero, sit amet adipiscing sem neque sed ipsum. Nam quam nunc, blandit vel, luctus pulvinar, hendrerit id, lorem. Maecenas nec odio et ante tincidunt tempus. Donec vitae sapien ut libero venenatis faucibus.

Nullam quis ante. Etiam sit amet orci eget eros faucibus tincidunt. Duis leo. Sed fringilla mauris sit amet nibh. Donec sodales sagittis magna. Sed consequat, leo eget bibendum sodales, augue velit cursus nunc.

All photos by Lynn Johnson

Click the links below to view photos at full-screen resolution (2608 × 1736).

  1. Residents say Riverdale was a true community.
  2. Some vowed to keep their community.
  3. Debra Eck became a reluctant leader.
  4. Kids at Riverdale witnessed their village empty.
  5. (no caption)
  6. Eric Daniels drives a frack water truck 12 hours a day.
  7. Residents and thieves stripped aluminum siding.
  8. Lessons from organizers in civil disobedience.
  9. Residents blocked access; owners brought in private security.
  10. Confronting a company man recording license plates.
  11. A new fence separates residents from advocates.
  12. Deb Eck finally decides to move.
  13. By mid-June the last families had left Riverdale.
  14. The Eck’s new place.


Riverdale Mobile Home Park

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Aenean commodo ligula eget dolor. Aenean massa. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Donec quam felis, ultricies nec, pellentesque eu, pretium quis, sem. Nulla consequat massa quis enim. Donec pede justo, fringilla vel, aliquet nec, vulputate eget, arcu. In enim justo, rhoncus ut, imperdiet a, venenatis vitae, justo.

Nullam dictum felis eu pede mollis pretium. Integer tincidunt. Cras dapibus. Vivamus elementum semper nisi. Aenean vulputate eleifend tellus. Aenean leo ligula, porttitor eu, consequat vitae, eleifend ac, enim. Aliquam lorem ante, dapibus in, viverra quis, feugiat a, tellus. Phasellus viverra nulla ut metus varius laoreet. Quisque rutrum. Aenean imperdiet. Etiam ultricies nisi vel augue. Curabitur ullamcorper ultricies nisi. Nam eget dui. Etiam rhoncus. Maecenas tempus, tellus eget condimentum rhoncus, sem quam semper libero, sit amet adipiscing sem neque sed ipsum. Nam quam nunc, blandit vel, luctus pulvinar, hendrerit id, lorem. Maecenas nec odio et ante tincidunt tempus. Donec vitae sapien ut libero venenatis faucibus.

Nullam quis ante. Etiam sit amet orci eget eros faucibus tincidunt. Duis leo. Sed fringilla mauris sit amet nibh. Donec sodales sagittis magna. Sed consequat, leo eget bibendum sodales, augue velit cursus nunc.

 

Photojournalist Lynn Johnson is known for her intense, sensitive work.

Photojournalist Lynn Johnson

Dividing her time between assignments for National Geographic and various foundations, Johnson has traveled from Siberia to Zambia and photographed celebrities including Tiger Woods, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Mister Rogers and the entire Supreme Court. With her Leicas, she has climbed the radio antenna atop Chicago’s Hancock Tower and dangled from helicopters in Antarctica. Yet her favorite assignments have been emotionally demanding stories about ordinary people; a family struggling with AIDS (Life), the death of an African-American coach in Amish country (Sports Illustrated), native Hawaiians who protect traditional ways (NG), the impact of zoonotic diseases around the world (NG).

Her vision is subtle. She invites the viewer to find the meaning in the frame. Her shooting style is equally low key allowing her subjects to reveal themselves to the camera. The photographs she strives for are compassionate. After 30 years of practicing photography, she sees her personal work moving from that of an observer to advocate.

As a Knight Fellow in the School of Visual Communications at Ohio University, Johnson completed a rigorous program that included her Masters thesis, an exhibit about the impact of hate crimes on American society, Hate Kills. Perhaps the most rewarding aspect of her fellowship was the teaching component that allowed her to share her passion and commitment with other students in the Visual Studies Program, helping to develop the talents and ethics of a new generation of photographers.

Johnson first earned a B.A. in Photographic Illustration and Photojournalism at the Rochester Institute of Technology in 1975. After graduating, she was a Staff Photographer at The Pittsburgh Press for seven years before beginning her freelance career as a contract photographer for Black Star then Aurora Photos. She is currently represented by the National Geographic Image Collection.

 

Awards for Lynn Johnson’s work

  • Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for Coverage of the Disadvantaged
  • World Press Awards
  • Pictures of the Year Award – University of Missouri School of Journalism

Links to Lynn Johnson’s work

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THE BURN BLOG: September 10, 2012

The University of Texas is curating this series of blogs to raise important questions about Energy.  This is a unique opportunity for you to join in discussions with some of the world’s brightest energy minds.

 

Energy Efficient Buildings: Technology Only Part of the Solution

Matt Fajkus

September 10, 2012
 

Most experts agree we’re in an energy crisis. Since 40% of energy used in the United States is consumed by buildings, pressure has increased to design and build more energy-efficient structures and respective systems to reduce demand. As humans, our natural inclination is to look for a technological solution. That’s the approach taken with the Passive House Standard, which started in Germany and is intended to create buildings which are passively energy-efficient, typically with highly-insulated, airtight construction, and the incorporation of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaic panels.

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Fracking vs. Riverdale Mobile Home Park 2608

A Photo Essay by Lynn Johnson

Riverdale Mobile Home Park

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Aenean commodo ligula eget dolor. Aenean massa. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Donec quam felis, ultricies nec, pellentesque eu, pretium quis, sem. Nulla consequat massa quis enim. Donec pede justo, fringilla vel, aliquet nec, vulputate eget, arcu. In enim justo, rhoncus ut, imperdiet a, venenatis vitae, justo.

Nullam dictum felis eu pede mollis pretium. Integer tincidunt. Cras dapibus. Vivamus elementum semper nisi. Aenean vulputate eleifend tellus. Aenean leo ligula, porttitor eu, consequat vitae, eleifend ac, enim. Aliquam lorem ante, dapibus in, viverra quis, feugiat a, tellus. Phasellus viverra nulla ut metus varius laoreet. Quisque rutrum. Aenean imperdiet. Etiam ultricies nisi vel augue. Curabitur ullamcorper ultricies nisi. Nam eget dui. Etiam rhoncus. Maecenas tempus, tellus eget condimentum rhoncus, sem quam semper libero, sit amet adipiscing sem neque sed ipsum. Nam quam nunc, blandit vel, luctus pulvinar, hendrerit id, lorem. Maecenas nec odio et ante tincidunt tempus. Donec vitae sapien ut libero venenatis faucibus.

Nullam quis ante. Etiam sit amet orci eget eros faucibus tincidunt. Duis leo. Sed fringilla mauris sit amet nibh. Donec sodales sagittis magna. Sed consequat, leo eget bibendum sodales, augue velit cursus nunc.

All photos by Lynn Johnson

Click the links below to view photos at full-screen resolution (2608 × 1736).

  1. Residents say Riverdale was a true community.
  2. Some vowed to keep their community.
  3. Debra Eck became a reluctant leader.
  4. Kids at Riverdale witnessed their village empty.
  5. (no caption)
  6. Eric Daniels drives a frack water truck 12 hours a day.
  7. Residents and thieves stripped aluminum siding.
  8. Lessons from organizers in civil disobedience.
  9. Residents blocked access; owners brought in private security.
  10. Confronting a company man recording license plates.
  11. A new fence separates residents from advocates.
  12. Deb Eck finally decides to move.
  13. By mid-June the last families had left Riverdale.
  14. The Eck’s new place.


Riverdale Mobile Home Park

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Aenean commodo ligula eget dolor. Aenean massa. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Donec quam felis, ultricies nec, pellentesque eu, pretium quis, sem. Nulla consequat massa quis enim. Donec pede justo, fringilla vel, aliquet nec, vulputate eget, arcu. In enim justo, rhoncus ut, imperdiet a, venenatis vitae, justo.

Nullam dictum felis eu pede mollis pretium. Integer tincidunt. Cras dapibus. Vivamus elementum semper nisi. Aenean vulputate eleifend tellus. Aenean leo ligula, porttitor eu, consequat vitae, eleifend ac, enim. Aliquam lorem ante, dapibus in, viverra quis, feugiat a, tellus. Phasellus viverra nulla ut metus varius laoreet. Quisque rutrum. Aenean imperdiet. Etiam ultricies nisi vel augue. Curabitur ullamcorper ultricies nisi. Nam eget dui. Etiam rhoncus. Maecenas tempus, tellus eget condimentum rhoncus, sem quam semper libero, sit amet adipiscing sem neque sed ipsum. Nam quam nunc, blandit vel, luctus pulvinar, hendrerit id, lorem. Maecenas nec odio et ante tincidunt tempus. Donec vitae sapien ut libero venenatis faucibus.

Nullam quis ante. Etiam sit amet orci eget eros faucibus tincidunt. Duis leo. Sed fringilla mauris sit amet nibh. Donec sodales sagittis magna. Sed consequat, leo eget bibendum sodales, augue velit cursus nunc.

 

Photojournalist Lynn Johnson is known for her intense, sensitive work.

Photojournalist Lynn Johnson

Dividing her time between assignments for National Geographic and various foundations, Johnson has traveled from Siberia to Zambia and photographed celebrities including Tiger Woods, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Mister Rogers and the entire Supreme Court. With her Leicas, she has climbed the radio antenna atop Chicago’s Hancock Tower and dangled from helicopters in Antarctica. Yet her favorite assignments have been emotionally demanding stories about ordinary people; a family struggling with AIDS (Life), the death of an African-American coach in Amish country (Sports Illustrated), native Hawaiians who protect traditional ways (NG), the impact of zoonotic diseases around the world (NG).

Her vision is subtle. She invites the viewer to find the meaning in the frame. Her shooting style is equally low key allowing her subjects to reveal themselves to the camera. The photographs she strives for are compassionate. After 30 years of practicing photography, she sees her personal work moving from that of an observer to advocate.

As a Knight Fellow in the School of Visual Communications at Ohio University, Johnson completed a rigorous program that included her Masters thesis, an exhibit about the impact of hate crimes on American society, Hate Kills. Perhaps the most rewarding aspect of her fellowship was the teaching component that allowed her to share her passion and commitment with other students in the Visual Studies Program, helping to develop the talents and ethics of a new generation of photographers.

Johnson first earned a B.A. in Photographic Illustration and Photojournalism at the Rochester Institute of Technology in 1975. After graduating, she was a Staff Photographer at The Pittsburgh Press for seven years before beginning her freelance career as a contract photographer for Black Star then Aurora Photos. She is currently represented by the National Geographic Image Collection.

 

Awards for Lynn Johnson’s work

  • Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for Coverage of the Disadvantaged
  • World Press Awards
  • Pictures of the Year Award – University of Missouri School of Journalism

Links to Lynn Johnson’s work

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Fracking vs. Riverdale Mobile Home Park: A Photo Essay by Lynn Johnson

The Riverdale mobile home park used to sit on the banks of the Susquehanna River in north-central Pennsylvania. It housed working families with modest incomes. Earlier this year, all the Riverdale trailer families were evicted to make room for a pump station and pipeline that would move Susquehanna water to fracking sites elsewhere in the state.

Some from Riverdale went willingly. Some did not. Some stayed to fight the evictions. Everyone shared in the hardships. The disruption unsettled families and undermined their support networks as they wondered what to do and where to go.

BURN host Alex Chadwick visits the stories of Riverdale with free lance photographer and Pennsylvania resident Lynn Johnson, who works on assignment for National Geographic.

Launch the gallery:

Photojournalist Lynn Johnson is known for her intense, sensitive work.

Photojournalist Lynn Johnson

Photojournalist Lynn Johnson is known for her intense and sensitive work, photographing the global human condition for the past 35 years. As a regular contributor to publications such as National Geographic and various foundations, Johnson has documented everything from celebrities and tragedies, bringing a subtle perspective to tough issues—the scourge of landmines, the value of threatened languages, living with HIV and the global danger of zoonotic disease.

Her photographs, created with fairness and compassion are an attempt to honor and share the stories of others. After 30 years in her profession, she now sees her perspective moving from that of observer to advocate. Johnson uses her role as photographer and teacher to promote dialogue and encourage a change in attitudes and perceptions of intolerance and prejudice. Her Master’s thesis as a Knight Fellow at Ohio University, Hate Kills, illuminates the impact of hate crimes on American society.

She is also a frequent educator with National Geographic’s Photo Camps, using photography to help at-risk youth around the world to develop their own voices.

Awards for Lynn Johnson’s work

  • Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for Coverage of the Disadvantaged
  • World Press Awards
  • Pictures of the Year Award – University of Missouri School of Journalism

Links to Lynn Johnson’s work

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For a town in need of jobs, going nuclear was easy call

The oil town of Eunice, N.M., welcomed a uranium enrichment plant for its steady jobs. A canister of raw uranium awaits processing at the plant, operated by the European company Urenco.

The oil town of Eunice, N.M., welcomed a uranium enrichment plant for its steady jobs. A canister of raw uranium awaits processing at the plant, operated by the European company Urenco.

To understand how a nuclear facility came to rest at this far edge of the high plains, you first have to understand what else is here. Hear that sound? That’s the rhythmic squeak of a horse head oil pump. There’s a pump jack every few blocks in Eunice, and thousands more stretching east, all the way past Odessa, Texas. BURN’s Loretta Williams reports.

“For a town in need of jobs, going nuclear was easy call” aired on APM Marketplace September 5, 2012:

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