A Photo Essay by Lynn Johnson

Riverdale Mobile Home Park

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Nullam quis ante. Etiam sit amet orci eget eros faucibus tincidunt. Duis leo. Sed fringilla mauris sit amet nibh. Donec sodales sagittis magna. Sed consequat, leo eget bibendum sodales, augue velit cursus nunc.

All photos by Lynn Johnson

Click the links below to view photos at full-screen resolution (2608 × 1736).

  1. Residents say Riverdale was a true community.
  2. Some vowed to keep their community.
  3. Debra Eck became a reluctant leader.
  4. Kids at Riverdale witnessed their village empty.
  5. (no caption)
  6. Eric Daniels drives a frack water truck 12 hours a day.
  7. Residents and thieves stripped aluminum siding.
  8. Lessons from organizers in civil disobedience.
  9. Residents blocked access; owners brought in private security.
  10. Confronting a company man recording license plates.
  11. A new fence separates residents from advocates.
  12. Deb Eck finally decides to move.
  13. By mid-June the last families had left Riverdale.
  14. The Eck’s new place.


Riverdale Mobile Home Park

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Aenean commodo ligula eget dolor. Aenean massa. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Donec quam felis, ultricies nec, pellentesque eu, pretium quis, sem. Nulla consequat massa quis enim. Donec pede justo, fringilla vel, aliquet nec, vulputate eget, arcu. In enim justo, rhoncus ut, imperdiet a, venenatis vitae, justo.

Nullam dictum felis eu pede mollis pretium. Integer tincidunt. Cras dapibus. Vivamus elementum semper nisi. Aenean vulputate eleifend tellus. Aenean leo ligula, porttitor eu, consequat vitae, eleifend ac, enim. Aliquam lorem ante, dapibus in, viverra quis, feugiat a, tellus. Phasellus viverra nulla ut metus varius laoreet. Quisque rutrum. Aenean imperdiet. Etiam ultricies nisi vel augue. Curabitur ullamcorper ultricies nisi. Nam eget dui. Etiam rhoncus. Maecenas tempus, tellus eget condimentum rhoncus, sem quam semper libero, sit amet adipiscing sem neque sed ipsum. Nam quam nunc, blandit vel, luctus pulvinar, hendrerit id, lorem. Maecenas nec odio et ante tincidunt tempus. Donec vitae sapien ut libero venenatis faucibus.

Nullam quis ante. Etiam sit amet orci eget eros faucibus tincidunt. Duis leo. Sed fringilla mauris sit amet nibh. Donec sodales sagittis magna. Sed consequat, leo eget bibendum sodales, augue velit cursus nunc.

 

Photojournalist Lynn Johnson is known for her intense, sensitive work.

Photojournalist Lynn Johnson

Dividing her time between assignments for National Geographic and various foundations, Johnson has traveled from Siberia to Zambia and photographed celebrities including Tiger Woods, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Mister Rogers and the entire Supreme Court. With her Leicas, she has climbed the radio antenna atop Chicago’s Hancock Tower and dangled from helicopters in Antarctica. Yet her favorite assignments have been emotionally demanding stories about ordinary people; a family struggling with AIDS (Life), the death of an African-American coach in Amish country (Sports Illustrated), native Hawaiians who protect traditional ways (NG), the impact of zoonotic diseases around the world (NG).

Her vision is subtle. She invites the viewer to find the meaning in the frame. Her shooting style is equally low key allowing her subjects to reveal themselves to the camera. The photographs she strives for are compassionate. After 30 years of practicing photography, she sees her personal work moving from that of an observer to advocate.

As a Knight Fellow in the School of Visual Communications at Ohio University, Johnson completed a rigorous program that included her Masters thesis, an exhibit about the impact of hate crimes on American society, Hate Kills. Perhaps the most rewarding aspect of her fellowship was the teaching component that allowed her to share her passion and commitment with other students in the Visual Studies Program, helping to develop the talents and ethics of a new generation of photographers.

Johnson first earned a B.A. in Photographic Illustration and Photojournalism at the Rochester Institute of Technology in 1975. After graduating, she was a Staff Photographer at The Pittsburgh Press for seven years before beginning her freelance career as a contract photographer for Black Star then Aurora Photos. She is currently represented by the National Geographic Image Collection.

 

Awards for Lynn Johnson’s work

  • Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for Coverage of the Disadvantaged
  • World Press Awards
  • Pictures of the Year Award – University of Missouri School of Journalism

Links to Lynn Johnson’s work