The city partly flooded again this spring from a couple of days of heavy rain. Built on filled marsh, Hoboken is highly vulnerable - but had never seen anything like Hurricane Sandy. (Photo: Donna Ferrato)

The city partly flooded again this spring from a couple of days of heavy rain. Built on filled marsh, Hoboken is highly vulnerable – but had never seen anything like Hurricane Sandy. (Photo: Donna Ferrato)

Alex Chadwick, BURN Host

It’s been almost 9 months since Hurricane Sandy blew out all of Hoboken, New Jersey’s power. It took a week and a half to pump the water out of the city, and repairs to public and private property, and to the grid system, are going to be very expensive.

Mayor Dawn Zimmer spoke with BURN host Alex Chadwick about her city’s plans to get ready when – not if – the next storm comes to Hoboken.

Listen to The Hoboken power emergency – part 1.

The city began to flood here, at the edge of Weehawken Cove, where the explorer Henry Hudson once anchored. Hoboken is a transportation hub, with a growing population, neighborhood shops, and easy access to New York. But the combination of low topography and rising seas means more trouble to come. (Photo: Donna Ferrato)

The city began to flood here, at the edge of Weehawken Cove, where the explorer Henry Hudson once anchored. Hoboken is a transportation hub, with a growing population, neighborhood shops, and easy access to New York. But the combination of low topography and rising seas means more trouble to come. (Photo: Donna Ferrato)

 

Rebuilding underway after the ground level floor of the community center flooded - as did the headquarters for the Fire Department, two other fire stations and the central office of emergency services. The water damages include old, paper-based files of birth records. The city is trying to restore them. (Photo: Donna Ferrato)

Rebuilding underway after the ground level floor of the community center flooded – as did the headquarters for the Fire Department, two other fire stations and the central office of emergency services. The water damages include old, paper-based files of birth records. The city is trying to restore them. (Photo: Donna Ferrato)